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dc.creatorRistanović, Elizabeta
dc.creatorKokoskov, Nenad S.
dc.creatorCrozier, Ian
dc.creatorKuhn, Jens H.
dc.creatorGligić, Ana
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-18T10:54:09Z
dc.date.available2021-02-18T10:54:09Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1092-2172
dc.identifier.urihttp://intor.torlakinstitut.com/handle/123456789/570
dc.description.abstractIn 1967, several workers involved in poliomyelitis vaccine development and production fell ill at three different locations in Europe with a severe and often lethal novel disease associated with grivets (Chlorocebus aethiops) imported from Uganda. This disease was named Marburg virus disease (MVD) after the West German town of Marburg an der Lahn, where most human infections and deaths had been recorded. Consequently, the Marburg episode received the most scientific and media attention. Cases that occurred in Frankfurt am Main, West Germany, were also described in commonly accessible scientific literature, although they were less frequently cited than those pertaining to the Marburg infections. However, two infections occurring in a third location, in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, have seemingly been all but forgotten. Due in part to their absence in commonly used databases and in part to the fact that they were written in languages other than English, the important articles describing this part of the outbreak are very rarely cited. Here, we summarize this literature and correct published inaccuracies to remind a younger generation of scientists focusing on Marburg virus and its closest filoviral relatives of this important historical context. Importantly, and unfortunately, the three episodes of infection of 1967 still represent the best in-depth clinical look at MVD in general and in the context of "modern" medicine (fully resourced versus less-resourced capacity) in particular. Hence, each individual case of these episodes holds crucial information for health care providers who may be confronted with MVD today.en
dc.publisherAmer Soc Microbiology, Washington
dc.relationLaulima Government Solutions, LLC
dc.relationU.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)United States Department of Health
dc.relationNIAIDUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH
dc.relationLaulima Government Solutions, LLC [HHSN272201800013C]
dc.relationfederal funds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH) [HHSN261
dc.relationClinical Monitoring Research Program Directorate, Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research - NCI
dc.rightsrestrictedAccess
dc.sourceMicrobiology and Molecular Biology Reviews
dc.subjectBelgradeen
dc.subjectFiloviridaeen
dc.subjectfilovirusen
dc.subjectMarburg hemorrhagic feveren
dc.subjectmarburgvirusen
dc.subjectMarburg virusen
dc.subjectMarburg virus diseaseen
dc.subjectMHFen
dc.subjectMVDen
dc.subjectTorlaken
dc.subjectVHFen
dc.subjectviral hemorrhagic feveren
dc.titleA Forgotten Episode of Marburg Virus Disease: Belgrade, Yugoslavia, 1967en
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseARR
dc.citation.issue2
dc.citation.other84(2)
dc.citation.rankaM21~
dc.citation.volume84
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/MMBR.00095-19
dc.identifier.pmid32404328
dc.identifier.rcubconv_476
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85084626647
dc.identifier.wos000540853300010
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion


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